Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh GMP - Good Manufacturing Practice - ZooScape LLC Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh

Blue Cohosh

Images Product Name Size ZIN Price Quantity Add to Cart
Blue Cohosh Tea (Loose) 4 oz 514706 $17.68
8 oz 514707 $24.95
Blue Cohosh Tea 25 tea bags 514708 $19.45
50 tea bags 514709 $30.46
Blue Cohosh Cream 2 oz 514710 $24.75
Blue Cohosh - Salve Ointment 2 oz 514711 $30.70
Blue Cohosh Glycerite Liquid Extract (1:5) 1 oz - No Flavor 522152 $17.59
1 oz - Strawberry 522153 $19.45
1 oz - Vanilla 522154 $19.45
1 oz - Chocolate 522155 $19.45
1 oz - Mint 522156 $19.45
Blue Cohosh - 450 mg 100 capsules 514703 $20.88
Blue Cohosh Powder 4 oz 514704 $19.45
1 oz 514705 $9.43

• Traditionally used to help support the pain associated with menstrual cramps and joint pain, coughs, sore throat, congestion and much more.
Blue Cohosh is an herb derived from the rhizome and roots of a small North perennial. Blue Cohosh is also referred to by names such as Papoose Root or Squaw Root, reflecting on the use of this herb by Native women who brewed a bitter tea from Blue Cohosh to help support menstrual cramps and helps ease the pains associated with childbirth. Blue Cohosh tea can support uterine contractions that may speed delivery, and was widely used by natives and early settlers to help support common maladies such as sore throat, joint pain, anxiety, coughs, and colic.

Modern herbalists often recommend Blue Cohosh to support menstruation, and as uterine stimulant and antispasmodic. It can also be used as a potenial diuretic to help support excess fluids, as an expectorant to help support congestion, and as a diaphoretic to reduce toxins by inducing sweating. Traditional herbalists will often combine Blue Cohosh and Black Cohosh to effect a more balanced product for nerves, and to enhance the herbs antispasmodic effects. It is combined with other herbs to promote their effects in supporting coughs, nervous disorders, urinary tract ailments and joint pain. Researchers studying Blue Cohosh isolated an alkaloid, methylcytisine, which closely resembles nicotine in its ability to stimulate intestinal activity, raise respiration, and elevate blood pressure.

Common names are beechdrops, blueberry root, blue ginseng, papooseroot, and blue or yellow ginseng. British health practitioners learned of blue cohosh from Native health practitioners and it was listed during the late 1800s in the U. S. Pharmacopoeia. It is well known in supporting female ailments, and can be used to regulate menstrual flow - particularly for suppressed menstruation. Natives used it to try to induce labor and to help support children's colic and cramps.

Plant Facts and Growing Tips

Plant: A perennial found in eastern North America with a round, erect stem growing from knotty rootstock. It produces six-petaled, yellow-green flowers, and the fruit is a pea-size, dark blue berry.

Height: 1 to 3 feet.

Soil: Moist, rich, humusy soil found near running streams and in swampy areas.

Exposure: Partial to full shade.

Propagation: Division or from seeds. To divide, make cuttings from the rhizome in early fall or spring. Seeds should be planted in a cold frame or a protected bed outdoors. With seeds sown in fall, some will germinate the following spring; others may not germinate for a year.

Part Used for Tea: Root.

Taste: Sweetish at first, then bitter; acrid and pungent.

How to Brew

By Decoction: Simmer 1 ounce root in 1 pint boiling water for 15 minutes. Take 2 tablespoons every 2 to 3 hours, hot.

Blue cohosh can be irritating to mucous membranes and also may cause contact dermatitis. Children have been poisoned by the berries. Use it only with the advice of your health practitioner.

Women's Minty Tonic

For a minty-flavored women's tonic that is energizing:
  • 1 teaspoon blue cohosh root
  • 1 teaspoon dong quai root
  • 2 teaspoons dried peppermint leaves
Simmer the blue cohosh and dong quai root in 4 cups water for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and add the peppermint leaves. Let steep another 5 minutes, then strain.

Blue Cohosh is an herb derived from the rhizome and roots of a small North perennial. Blue Cohosh is also referred to by names such as Papoose Root or Squaw Root, reflecting on the use of this herb by Native women who brewed a bitter tea from Blue Cohosh to help support menstrual cramps and helps ease the pains associated with childbirth. Blue Cohosh tea can support uterine contractions that may speed delivery, and was widely used by natives and early settlers to help supportcommon maladies such as sore throat, joint pain, anxiety, coughs, and colic.

Modern herbalists often recommend Blue Cohosh to support menstruation, and as uterine stimulant and antispasmodic. It can also be used as a potenial diuretic to help support excess fluids, as an expectorant to help support congestion, and as a diaphoretic to reduce toxins by inducing sweating. Traditional herbalists will often combine Blue Cohosh and Black Cohosh to effect a more balanced product for nerves, and to enhance the herbs antispasmodic effects. It is combined with other herbs to promote their effects in supporting coughs, nervous disorders, urinary tract ailments and joint pain. Researchers studying Blue Cohosh isolated an alkaloid, methylcytisine, which closely resembles nicotine in its ability to stimulate intestinal activity, raise respiration, and elevate blood pressure.

Blue Cohosh
Caulophyllum thalictroides L.
Berberidaceae, Barberry family.

Other Common Names: Squawroot, Papoose Root, Blue Ginseng, Yellow Ginseng, Blue Berry Cohosh, Blue Berry Root.

Blue Cohosh is found from New England south to the Appalachian regions of the Carolinas. It grows in moist, mountain glades under hardwoods.

This plant usually attains a height of three feet with one or two large, thrice divided, compound leaves with many round-lobed leaflets resembling meadow rue (Thalictrum dioicum) only proportionately larger. The flowers are tiny and inconspicuous, with greenish or maroon-tinged, petal-like sepals. The fruit is a blue berry the size of a large pea. The berry often hangs on into autumn, long after the leaves have withered away. The blue color of these berries gives the plant so many ofits common names.

As the name squawroot indicates, its application is for the benefit of women. It has been considered by Indians and white folk alike to be an excellent regulator, useful in cramps and menstrual difficulties of all kinds. It is used during pregnancy and childbirth as a uterine toner, to ease the pain of labor, and promote prompt delivery. A tea of Blue Cohosh was taken during the last three or four weeks of pregnancy.

The Blue Cohosh rhizome, due to its intense tangle of roots, is a little more difficult to unearth and wash than the average woodland root. When fresh, the rhizome and roots are a light tannish-yellow in color (hence the name yellow ginseng) and the next year's stem buds are tinged with lavender.

The acrid, bitter, and mildly toxic rhizome of the blue cohosh plant (also known as the papooseroot or squawroot) supports the liver with emmenagogue, antispasmodic, diuretic, and diaphoretic properties. Blue cohosh has demonstrated usefulness for menstrual irregularities, and genito-urinary disorders. The biochemical properties of the herb include alkaloids, a disinfectant saponin, glycosides, gum, starch, salts, phosphoric acid and a soluble resin.

Blue cohosh can be used to help support menstrual irregularities, amenorrhea and dysmenorrhea, and also to ease the pangs of childbirth.

While not related, both black and blue cohosh are often found growing in close proximity and both have similar emmenagogic, antispasmodic properties. Black cohosh is thought to have more estrogenic action while blue cohosh is more of an actual blood mover.

A gynecological formula for delayed or stopped menstruation is equal parts blue cohosh, black cohosh, angelica, cramp bark, wild ginger and half part ginger. Take as a tea or powder three times daily for at least three months, stopping only during the actual period itself.

While, as the name "papoose root" suggests, it can be used immediately before or during childbirth, usually as a liquid extract to ease childbirth, it should not be used during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy.

Blue Cohosh

Caulophyllum species

C. thalictroides (L) Michx. = yellow-flowered blue cohosh.
C. giganteum (Farwell) Loconte & W.H. Blackwell = purple-flowered blue cohosh.

These species have only recently been recognized as separate, and much of what is known and written about them is applicable to both. The name "blue cohosh" in the following discussion refers to both species.

English Common Names

Blue cohosh, papoose root (papoose-root), squaw root (squaw-root), blue ginseng, yellow ginseng, blue berry, blueberry root, beechdrops.

Blue cohosh should not to be confused with black cohosh, Cimicifuga racemosa. The latter is apparently a more widely utilized and possibly safer useful plant. The names papoose root and squaw root are believed to be derived from use by indigenous people to ease pain associated with childbirth. "Squaw root" has also been applied to Cimicifuga racemosa. Blue cohosh is the only name commonly encountered.

French Common Names

Caulophylle faux-pigamon, caulophylle, léontice faux-pigamon, faux-pigamon, cohoche bleu, graines à chapelet.

Morphology

This erect perennial produces bluish-purple clumps of young shoots in April. The flowers, 1-2 cm across, begin to open in April and May while the leaves are still folded. Authors have differed in their interpretation of floral parts of blue cohosh. What some have called sepals, others have called petals, and some have thought that the nectaries originated from either petals or anthers. The flowers have six prominent sepals (5-6 mm long), six nectaries probably derived from the stamens, and six stamens. The purple-flowered blue cohosh flowers up to a week or two earlier than the yellow-flowered species in many, but not all localities. In addition to its distinctive flower color, the purple-flowered plant has styles 1-1.5 mm long whereas those of the yellow-flowered species are 0.1-0.7 mm long. In other respects the two species are very similar. The several to many flowers are borne in branching clusters. By the time the forest canopy has fully developed in late spring Blue Cohosh the stems have reached their maximum height of between 30 and 75 cm. Each stem bears two compound leaves, one large, centrally located, and three times divided into leaflets, and a smaller leaf just below the inflorescence. Although definitely green, the mature leaves retain a bluish-purple cast and to some extent a whitish bloom, and are smooth, with leaflets that are 2- or 3-lobed (not serrated as in some similar species). These characters help to distinguish blue cohosh leaves from those of baneberries (Actaea spp.), meadow-rues (Thalictrum spp.) and black cohosh. By late summer the leaves deteriorate, leaving stems with what appear to be dark blue berries 1-1.5 cm in diameter. These are naked seeds with a fleshy blue covering. The horizontal rootstock is matted and knotty, yellow-brown externally and whitish to yellow internally, with many stem scars and numerous cylindrical branching roots The rootstock tastes bittersweet and acrid. and has a slightly pungent fragrant odor.

Classification and Geography

Prior to 1964 it was believed that only one kind of blue cohosh existed in North America, but that year well known Canadian plant taxonomist William Dore wrote a paper entitled "Two kinds of blue cohosh." In his article Dore related the earlier observations of Harold Minshall, an expert on flowering phenology, that some plants of blue cohosh flower almost 2 weeks earlier in the spring than others. Dore demonstrated that the early flowering plants had purple flowers with long styles, while the later blooming plants had yellowish-green or creamy flowers with short styles. He also noted differences in geographic distribution within southern Ontario. Based on these differences Dore distinguished the two kinds using the available varietal names: var. thalictroides for the short-styled plant; and var. giganteum Farwell for the long-styled plant. However Dore was of the opinion that they should be considered different species. Later experts agreed and the var. giganteum was elevated to the rank of species in 1981 with additional supporting data published in 1985. The two species can be distinguished even late in the year because styles persist on aborted flowers.

Purple-flowered blue cohosh occurs in the northern Appalachian and eastern Great Lakes region and is the more common and widespread of the two species in southern Ontario. Interestingly however, it has a rather restricted total range. In contrast yellow-flowered blue cohosh has a broad range extending further to the north, south, east, and west, and includes a large portion of eastern and midwestern North America. The genus Caulophyllum provides another example of the floristic relationship between eastern Asia and eastern North America (like May-apple, ginseng and goldenseal, all discussed in this work). The eastern Asian representative is C. robustum Maxim. (most closely related to C. thalictroides and once used as a variety of the latter), which differs from the North plants in having longer inflorescences on longer stems with more flowers.

Ecology

The species of blue cohosh grow in rich, wet to mesic, shady woods. In Canada they are most frequent in maple woods on limestone, in rocky, calcareous and organic substrates. A Michigan study suggested that seed production requires cross-pollination by insects, but visitation by insects, mostly flies and small bees, was sporadic. However, successful self-pollination was found to be relatively low. The two species are reproductively isolated due to differences in flowering time and other factors.

Medicinal Uses

Blue cohosh is a traditional woman's herb. The best known use is as a parturifacient, i.e., a substance that induces uterine contractions to speed delivery of a baby. Teas and root extracts of blue cohosh were used in the past by Indians and settlers to ease delivery at birth, reduce labor pains, and regulate menstruation. Blue cohosh was used by indigenous North s and early settlers to induce abortion, often in conjunction with black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa). Side effects included sleepiness, headaches, frequent urination and vomiting and arm and leg pains. Herbal abortion may be based on stimulating blood flow to the pelvic area and uterus, or stimulating a hormone responsible for uterine contractions. Blue cohosh has been associated with the latter mechanism. Although it promotes delivery, the extent to which blue cohosh causes abortion is unclear. Herbal abortion may be limited in effectiveness and is generally considered dangerous. Less commonly, the herb can be used to help support spasms, support stomach cramps, reduce bloating, and supportlung ailments, asthma, coughs, nervous disorders, urinary tract ailments, joint pain, breast pain, nervous cough, joint pain hysteria, and bee stings. The leaves of blue cohosh have been applied externally to help support the dermatitis induced by poison ivy and related species. In recent times, blue cohosh tea was even used for runners to ease the symptoms of muscle spasms and leg cramps. Although not widely used today in drug products, blue cohosh is available in natural herbal supplements, especially for women. Clinical studies are needed to establish the safety and efficacy of blue cohosh.

The Asian species of Caulophyllum, C. robustum, is used in China to help support joint pain and menstrual disorders, the roots either being soaked in rice wine or decocted for tea.

Chemistry

The roots and rhizomes are collected in the autumn at which time they are reported to be richest in active chemicals. The medicinally significant substances are evidently the glycosides (saponins, particularly caulosaponin) and alkaloids, particularly methylcytisine (caulophyffine), but also anagyrine, baptifoline, and magniflorine. Methylcytisine, which increases respiration, blood pressure, and intestinal motility (sometimes causing intestinal spasms), is reported to have effects similar to nicotine, although less pronounced. The glycosides have been associated with uterine stimulation, vasoconstriction of coronary blood vessels, and other useful properties. Plant extracts have been shown to be useful and, in rats, anti-inflammatory and ovule-inhibitory action has been reported, the latter suggesting contraceptive potential. The Russian literature on the chemical composition of the Asian C. robustum is much more extensive than the information available on the North species, and could prove useful because of the close relationship of the species.

Non-Medicinal Uses

Blue cohosh is occasionally cultivated as a garden ornamental. Some texts indicate that the pea-sized seeds can be roasted to make a coffee-like beverage.

Agricultural and Commercial Aspects

Blue cohosh is harvested from the wild in some parts of North America and is considered at risk from overcollecting in some areas. Although little information is available on its cultivation, it might be grown and harvested in much the same way as ginseng. Plants could be propagated by either root division after flowering or by seeds. Blue cohosh could become a health crop, and the climate and soil in parts of southern Canada including its natural range are well suited to its growth.

Myths, Legends, Tales, Folklore, and Interesting Facts
  • In 1915 wild Canadian dried rootstock of blue cohosh was worth 3 - 5½¢ a pound. Other prices for comparison: pair of socks: 4¢; steel frying pan: 8¢ skirt: $1.00; pair of shoes: $2.00; shotgun $5.00; man's suit: $10.00; bicycle: $15.00; piano: $100.00.
  • Modern flowering plants are divided into two great groups, dicots (dicotyledons, with two seed leaves), and monocots (monocotyledons, with one seed leaf). Most of the plants addressed in this work are dicots (sweet grass and sweet flag are monocots, and the keips are not flowering plants). Blue cohosh is a dicot, but is very unusual in having floral parts in multiples of three, like most monocots (for example, lilies, grasses, sedges and orchids).
  • The gymnosperms (mostly evergreen conifers like pines and spruces) are a more ancient lineage of plants, lacking true flowers. Another characteristic is naked seeds (gymnosperm is Greek for naked seed), and the naked seeds of the unusual Caulophyllum are curiously reminiscent of the quite unrelated gymnosperms.
  • Using herbs to regulate birth was considered to be incontrovertible evidence of witchcraft during the witch hunts (1450-1700), and so at the time reliable information on blue cohosh and some other herbs used to help support gynecological complaints was difficult to obtain.
  • In 1856, Charles Darwin questioned Harvard botanist Asa Gray about how the plants of eastern Asia, widely separated from the plants of eastern North America, came to be very similar. Gray subsequently examined a rich collection from Japan and wrote that: "perhaps the most interesting and unexpected discovery of the expedition is that of Caulophyllum thalictroides separated by 140 degrees of longitude, are we to suppose independent origin?" Gray later developed the explanation of a previously more continuous temperate flora that was separated in ancient times by geological and climate change. This influenced Darwin's theory of evolution.
TerraVita is an exclusive line of premium-quality, natural source products that use only the finest, purest and most potent ingredients found around the world. TerraVita is hallmarked by the highest possible standards of purity, potency, stability and freshness. All of our products are prepared with the highest elements of quality control, from raw materials through the entire manufacturing process, up to and including the moment that the bottles or bags are sealed for freshness and shipped out to you. Our highest possible standards are certified by independent laboratories and backed by our personal guarantee.

TerraVita exists to meet and ensure your family's health and wellness without the harmful effects or chemicals and prescription medications. We strive to make all of our products affordable and reliable and are constantly searching the market to maintain our affordability and to look for new ways to serve you and the ones you love. TerraVita has become a trusted household name for many families and can bring you and yours the very best herbal supplements, blends, teas and spices that are on the market today.

TerraVita is packed in tamper-proof, food-grade, recyclable containers.

ZooScape is proud to be the exclusive distributor of TerraVita teas, herbs and supplements in the United States, Canada and around the world. Please direct all wholesale and bulk inquiries to 1-844-449-0444.

Bianca Rosa is an exclusive line of premium-quality natural products sourced from only the finest and purest ingredients from around the world. Bianca Rosa is hallmarked by the highest possible standards of purity, stability and freshness. All Bianca Rosa products are prepared with the highest level of quality control, from the raw materials used through the entire manufacturing process, up to and including the moment that the finished product is sealed for freshness and shipped to you. Our highest possible standards backed by our personal guarantee.

Bianca Rosa makes all products as affordable as possible and we are constantly searching the market to maintain our affordability and to look for new ways to serve you. Bianca Rosa has been a trusted household name for many families throughout the world since the 1990s. Bianca Rosa is packed in tamper-proof, recyclable containers.

ZooScape is proud to be the exclusive distributor of all Bianca Rosa products, including creams, salves and oils in the United States, Canada and around the world. Please direct all wholesale and bulk inquiries to 1-844-449-0444.

Write a review

Note: HTML is not translated!
    Bad      Good

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Products are intended to support general well being and are not intended to treat, diagnose, prevent, or cure any condition or disease.

GMP - Good Manufacturing Practice - ZooScape LLC Blue Cohosh 4:1 Extract Blue Cohosh 4:1 Extract Blue Cohosh 4:1 Extract Blue Cohosh 4:1 Extract Blue Cohosh 4:1 Extract Blue Cohosh 4:1 Extract Blue Cohosh 4:1 Extract Blue Cohosh 4:1 Extract Blue Cohosh 4:1 Extract Blue Cohosh 4:1 Extract Blue Cohosh 4:1 Extract Blue Cohosh 4:1 Extract

Blue Cohosh 4:1 Extract

Images Product Name Size ZIN Price Quantity Add to Cart
Blue Cohosh 4:1 Extract Cream 2 oz 523903 $55.31
Blue Cohosh 4:1 Extract Salve 2 oz 523904 $60.68
Blue Cohosh 4:1 Extract - 450 mg 100 capsules 522981 $27.26
Blue Cohosh 4:1 Extract Powder 1 oz 522982 $13.68
4 oz 522983 $32.66

Bianca Rosa is an exclusive line of premium-quality natural products sourced from only the finest and purest ingredients from around the world. Bianca Rosa is hallmarked by the highest possible standards of purity, stability and freshness. All Bianca Rosa products are prepared with the highest level of quality control, from the raw materials used through the entire manufacturing process, up to and including the moment that the finished product is sealed for freshness and shipped to you. Our highest possible standards backed by our personal guarantee.

Bianca Rosa makes all products as affordable as possible and we are constantly searching the market to maintain our affordability and to look for new ways to serve you. Bianca Rosa has been a trusted household name for many families throughout the world since the 1990s. Bianca Rosa is packed in tamper-proof, recyclable containers.

ZooScape is proud to be the exclusive distributor of all Bianca Rosa products, including creams, salves and oils in the United States, Canada and around the world. Please direct all wholesale and bulk inquiries to 1-844-449-0444.

TerraVita is an exclusive line of premium-quality, natural source products that use only the finest, purest and most potent ingredients found around the world. TerraVita is hallmarked by the highest possible standards of purity, potency, stability and freshness. All of our products are prepared with the highest elements of quality control, from raw materials through the entire manufacturing process, up to and including the moment that the bottles or bags are sealed for freshness and shipped out to you. Our highest possible standards are certified by independent laboratories and backed by our personal guarantee.

TerraVita exists to meet and ensure your family's health and wellness without the harmful effects or chemicals and prescription medications. We strive to make all of our products affordable and reliable and are constantly searching the market to maintain our affordability and to look for new ways to serve you and the ones you love. TerraVita has become a trusted household name for many families and can bring you and yours the very best herbal supplements, blends, teas and spices that are on the market today.

TerraVita is packed in tamper-proof, food-grade, recyclable containers.

ZooScape is proud to be the exclusive distributor of TerraVita teas, herbs and supplements in the United States, Canada and around the world. Please direct all wholesale and bulk inquiries to 1-844-449-0444.

Write a review

Note: HTML is not translated!
    Bad      Good

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Products are intended to support general well being and are not intended to treat, diagnose, prevent, or cure any condition or disease.